|Press Release|Protest and Vigil to Support People’s Struggle Against Kudankulam Nuclear Power Plan

April 9, 2012 by · Comments Off on |Press Release|Protest and Vigil to Support People’s Struggle Against Kudankulam Nuclear Power Plan
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PUCL-Bangalore, with many other organisations, came together in front of Town Hall today to protest against the vicious police crackdown on the protesters opposed to the Kudankulam Nuclear Power Plant, in Tamil Nadu. So far 185 protesters, and 11 prominent activists from the region have been arrested, following the CM’s announcement to allow operation at KKNPP. People Movement Against Nuclear Energy convener Dr. SP Udaykumar and a senior activist Pushparayan are on an indefinite fast, together with twenty thousand others from the struggle against the nuclear plant.

PUCL with other Civil and Human rights organisations and many concerned citizens, are strongly opposed to the repressive tactics used by the Tamil Nadu state. We further condemn the move to subordinate a strongly democratic people’s opposition movement with false arrests and war-like tactics of switching off water and power connections to the village of Idinthakarai. We also strongly oppose the move by the State to give a green signal to KKNPP project when so many technical issues related to safety concerns still remain unanswered by the government and when the project has been demonstrated to be unnecessary, unsafe, expensive and undemocratic. We stand in solidarity with the people’s struggle against KKNPP and demand the release of all arrested people and to scrap the project immediately – its still not too late!

Dissent is an essential component of democracy, and this heavy-handed draconian approach by the state is not acceptable in a pluralistic society.

Press Release: FUKUSHIMA NUCLEAR DISASTER: LESSONS FOR INDIA

April 9, 2012 by · Comments Off on Press Release: FUKUSHIMA NUCLEAR DISASTER: LESSONS FOR INDIA
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On March 11, exactly one year ago, a huge nuclear disaster in human history occurred at Fukushima , such that three nuclear reactors in the Fukushima Daichii plant experienced a nuclear core meltdown. The associated series of hydrogen explosions in the plant released more than twenty times the radioactive radiation of the Hiroshima bomb, causing contamination of air, water, soil, all living and non-living matter. The real cost to human health and life are expected to show up in a few years.

While several western countries, including Japan, have responded to public pressure and plan to halt or phase out their nuclear programs, the Indian government’s response has been to insist that the technology is ‘fully safe’ and to continue with its massive nuclear expansion.

In observing the Fukushima anniversary, PUCL and partners express solidarity with the victims of the nuclear disaster and hope to reach out to fellow citizens to address critically the necessity of India’s nuclear program. The speakers invited to seminar spoke on a variety of issues related to resolving people’s growing nuclear trust-deficit with India’s projected growing need in the energy and power sectors.

Nagesh Hedge emphasized the hazardous nature of the entire nuclear cycle from uranium mining, processing and disposal of the nuclear waste. His arguments hit home when he spoke of the issues of uranium mining coming up at Gogi in Yadgir, on the Bhima river basin; the limited ore supply, if extracted, will destroy the environment, water systems, and cause extensive human damage, while providing for about 7 months of fuel for India’s projected future nuclear program. He spoke also of the large scale and growing public opposition to this project, and also to the proposed building units 5 and 6 at Kaiga.

Shankar Sharma, a power policy analyst, spoke on the need for conservation efforts, limiting transmission losses and the enormous potential of renewable energy initiatives. In states like Tamil Nadu, conversion from incandescent to CFL bulbs can save about 500 MW – which would be the State’s expected share from the Koodankulam nuclear plant, after accounting for losses! Transmission losses in our country are 24% compared to about 5% in developed nations. India’s current nuclear capability is only 2.4% of our total power budget – thus a saving in transmission losses is tantamount to producing, immediately, ten times more power than what we get from our nuclear sector – without any risk.

YB Ramakrishna, noted that renewables and alternatives were not only available, but can provide for India’s burgeoning energy needs using a variety of sources including, solar, bio-fuels, hydro etc. He also gave inspiring examples of successful implementation of distributed renewable energy schemes, including biomass.

VT Padmanabhan spoke of several grave and technical concerns associated with the Koodankulam Nuclear plant, such as the seismic instability of the region, and the dependence of KNPP’s fresh water supply for cooling from a desalination plant. None of these safety concerns were satisfactorily addressed by the expert panel appointed by the central govt.

Prof. Atul Chokshi, IISc, presented calculations showing that for India to meet its long-term projected nuclear aspirations would require a nuclear reactor every eleven kilometers along nation’s shoreline. Equivalent energy was possible from a distributed roof-top solar panel system over all households providing distributed, equitable power for our population – without transmission losses or risks!

The Fukushima anniversary provided a poignant reminder of the potential dangers of catastrophic nuclear accidents. The seminar demonstrated several potential strategies to provide for India’s energy needs, so that there are several viable alternatives to nuclear power

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